U.S. Department of Transportation Automated Vehicle Policy 3.0

In its Automated Vehicles 3.0, Preparing for the Future of Transportation, the United States Department of Transportation laid out its latest policy on automated vehicles.  The Department did not issue regulations on automated vehicles, and instead opted for, in its terms, a “flexible, responsible approach to a framework for multimodal automation.”  This article will discuss…

Talk: Panel Discussion on Automated Vehicles

In this video, I was a co-panelist with Ed Bradley, the Program Manager for Toyota North America, and Koorosh Olyai, Senior Principal, Advanced Transportation Management Systems for Stantec.  We discussed, among other topics, ethical programming of automated vehicles, expected introduction of automated vehicles, rural deployment of automated vehicles, and programming of automated vehicles.

Talk: Sue My Car Not Me: A Discussion of Civil Liability for Autonomous Vehicle Accidents

This video is a presentation I gave at the Alaska Forum on Autonomous Vehicles in Anchorage, Alaska.  In this presentation, I explain civil liability rules and why many people believe that liability for crashes will shift from the traditional driver to the automated vehicle.  I also discuss the Uber crash that killed Elaine Herzberg and…

Let’s Not Forget The Public Health Crisis of Human Driving

Earlier this week, Elaine Herzber was tragically killed in an accident involving an Uber autonomous vehicle.  Elaine was walking her bicycle across the street and was struck by an Uber autonomous vehicle.  She died at the hospital.

This accident should cause us to reflect and consider what happened.  Uber should assess why its autonomous technology did not detect Elaine.  Other manufacturers should assess whether their autonomous technologies would have detected Elaine.  However, this accident should not cause manufacturers to slow down or otherwise halt their development of autonomous vehicles.

You might ask why we should not slow down or otherwise halt the development of these vehicles.  The answer is simple: human driving is a public health crisis.

The Fatal Flaw of Semi-Autonomous Vehicles

Imagine that you own a semi-autonomous vehicle.  You purchased the vehicle months ago and each time you put the vehicle into autopilot mode, the vehicle drives safely.  Your semi-autonomous vehicle’s ability to drive safely and (perhaps) better than you has made you over-reliant on and have overconfidence in the technology’s ability, causing you to have automation bias.  Thus, today you decide that on your morning commute you will read a book while your vehicle makes the same drive on the highway.   Today, however, your semi-autonomous vehicle encounters a firetruck parked on the highway while traveling at 65 miles per hour.  Your semi-autonomous vehicle fails to see the firetruck and smashes into the back of the firetruck.  You may have to imagine this situation happening to you, but an unlucky owner of a Tesla Model S did not have to imagine this situation when his Tesla smashed into a firetruck last week in California.

Welcome to SueMyCar!

The year is 2025.  You pull up to a stoplight and patiently wait for the light to turn green.  Suddenly, the vehicle behind you collides into your car’s rear bumper.  Angry and frustrated, you storm out of your car to “greet” the man driving the vehicle that hit you.

“Why didn’t you stop?” you ask.

“I wasn’t driving.  My car is an autonomous vehicle.  I was reading my newspaper and did not know that my car was not going to stop.”  The man responds.

“Well, I don’t care whether you were driving or not.  My car is damaged.  I’m late for work.  It’s your fault.” You respond.

“I already told you that I was not driving.  My vehicle is an autonomous vehicle.  “It,” he points to his autonomous vehicle, “was driving.  It’s my vehicle’s fault.”

“I don’t care.  I will see you in court,” you assert.

“Sue My Car, Not Me!”

Welcome to SueMyCar!